Addicted & Obsessed.

Addicted & Obsessed.

Laura Carman.
I live to travel & love to blog.

“I don’t mind. I think there’s a prevalent, arrogant opinion in rock music, where people assume that the kids don’t know shit. And I think I’d rather be playing to 14-year-olds who aren’t jaded and whose record collections don’t exist to impress their friends. It’s this adult idea of guilty pleasures. ‘Oh I like this, but I don’t want anyone to know that I do,’ which is so pretentious. I don’t believe in that. There is something honest about the fact that the kids like your band, and that’s a great reward for us. There is no pretense.”

—   Patrick Stump on how he responds to critics who say Fall Out Boy is a band that only 14-year-olds can like in an interview with The Aquarian published on December 27, 2006
(via bandslash)

(Source: stumpomatic, via iminthedeepend)

theolduvaigorge:

Killing Pigs and Weed Maps: The Mostly Unread World of Academic Papers

  • by Aaron Gordon

According to one study, which was presumably read by more than three people, half of all academic papers are read by no more than three people. At one of the first academic conferences I ever attended, I heard an economist joke that dissertations are only read by three people: the author, their advisor, and the committee chair. It’s funny in the way that academic jokes are funny: not actually funny but it gets listeners to nod along with the central truth. This specific central truth must resonate with established academics, since I heard versions of this same joke at nearly every conference I attended thereafter.

Like many jokes, this particular one turns out to be half true. A burgeoning field of academic study called citation analysis (it’s exactly what it sounds like) has found that this joke holds true for not just dissertations, but many academic papers. A study at Indiana University found that “as many as 50% of papers are never read by anyone other than their authors, referees and journal editors.” That same study concluded that “some 90% of papers that have been published in academic journals are never cited.” That is, nine out of 10 academic papers—which both often take years to research, compile, submit, and get published, and are a major component by which a scholar’s output is measured—contribute little to the academic conversation.

Personally, I have witnessed paper presentations on 17th-century Scottish coins, obscure political parties in countries that no longer exist, and the definition of the word “capitalist.” I distinctly remember focusing not so much on the hyper-specific nature of these research topics, but how it must feel as an academic to spend so much time on a topic so far on the periphery of human interest. It’s not just a few academics, either; these esoteric topics are the rule in academia, not the exception. These topics get researched, presented, published, and, somewhat tragically, immediately dispatched to the far reaches of the JSTOR archives, a digital library consisting of over 2,000 journals.

In an effort to unearth some of these projects, I used a random word generator to search JSTOR and see what results appeared on the first page. What has been ignored?” (read more).

(Source: Pacific Standard)

(via formativequeerinfluences)

“Food doesn’t taste better or worse when documented by Instagram. Laughter is as genuine over Skype as it would be sharing a sofa. Pay attention. Take in nature, hold someone’s hand, read a book. But don’t ever apologize for snapping a photo of a sunrise after a hike, or blogging about the excitement of having a crush, or updating your goodreads account. All of these things are good and should be celebrated. Smile at strangers on the sidewalk and like your friends’ selfies. It’s all good for the human spirit.”

—   cogitoergoblog on Facebook  (via elauxe)

(Source: magicalmatt, via formativequeerinfluences)

Panic! At The Disco - This Is Gospel (Acoustic)

(Source: theblowjobsong, via nipplefreckle)

nialllhoran:

niall seems to say i love you to 5 seconds of summer a lot, do you think when they’re at his house and they’re asking him where the bowls and stuff are he just replies with i love you and they’re like okay but where are the bowls

(via beatweary)

jonwheeler4:

Taco cat spelt backwards is taco cat

jonwheeler4:

Taco cat spelt backwards is taco cat

(Source: u-gotta-kik, via tacoposey)

tempeh-princess:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

Have you heard of Ban Bossy? It’s the new initiative from Lean In and the Girl Scouts that’s trying to ban “bossy” and similar words that are used to bring down girls that are ambitious, take risks, and speak up. By changing the way we treat girls who lead, hopefully our generation will someday see more women in leadership roles. 

You can watch the 1:00 video with Beyonce, Jane Lynch, Condeleeza Rice, and Jennifer Garner here, or visit the Ban Bossy website

don’t read the youtube comments on this.

(via formativequeerinfluences)

Which cast member would you guys date?
Holland: (…) We’re all in a polyamorous relationship.

(Source: kirayukimura, via death2normalcy)

prevalentirrationality:

Just couldn’t help myself.

prevalentirrationality:

Just couldn’t help myself.

(via myhellhoundisbiggerthanyours)

thecottonproject:

Final for my Time Arts class. Nothing gets you in touch with your own anger quite like listening to this and thinking about all the times you’ve been objectified and belittled.

(via winchesterlicious)

prospitsheart:

theirtinywings:

mirkwoodling:

#puberty strikes again

son of a bitch we just got neville longbottomed by a goddamn cartoon

neville longbottomed

(via doctoralaskayoung)


Helena Bonham Carter and Tim Burton’s house
The house used to be two separate dwellings. Now, one belongs to Tim and one to Helena.
Each has its own very distinct decor: hers is girly, vintage and chintzy, while his is a gothic melange of ‘skeletons and weird things’ and floor lights in neon shades. Each partner has their own television, their own Sky Plus and their own kitchen - although Tim’s is barely used.
At night they sleep in their respective dwellings. Not only is Tim an insomniac who likes to pace and watch TV, he says that she talks too much and that he needs some peace and quiet away from her. And anyway, counters Helena, he snores.
And yet there is the occasional blurring of boundaries since Helena has a craft room in Tim’s half of the house where she likes to print hearts onto fabric and stitch ribbons onto mob caps. 
She has, as followers of her distinctly ‘shabby-chic’ style will testify, a weakness for fripperies such as broderie anglaise and bobbles.
The two studio houses are joined by a ground level communal room, which is essentially a very grand hallway. Recently, a third home was purchased in the street which is home to the nanny and the couple’s two children, Billy Ray, six, and Nell, two.
So how on earth does it work? 
'He always visits, which is really touching. He's always coming over,' says Helena of Tim, in a way that suggests she considers this a perfectly normal version of cohabitation. 
It’s a rather rum state of affairs, but Helena enthuses: ‘It really is a great idea. You never have to compromise emotionally or feel invaded.’
It is only when you start to consider how very different they are that you begin to understand why the set-up works so well. After all, Tim - the creative genius behind macabre works such as Sweeney Todd and Sleepy Hollow - prefers to speak as little as possible, while Helena loves nothing more than to chatter away.
'He's much shyer than me,' she has said. 'I used to say that he was a home for abandoned sentences.'

Helena Bonham Carter and Tim Burton’s house

The house used to be two separate dwellings. Now, one belongs to Tim and one to Helena.

Each has its own very distinct decor: hers is girly, vintage and chintzy, while his is a gothic melange of ‘skeletons and weird things’ and floor lights in neon shades. Each partner has their own television, their own Sky Plus and their own kitchen - although Tim’s is barely used.

At night they sleep in their respective dwellings. Not only is Tim an insomniac who likes to pace and watch TV, he says that she talks too much and that he needs some peace and quiet away from her. And anyway, counters Helena, he snores.

And yet there is the occasional blurring of boundaries since Helena has a craft room in Tim’s half of the house where she likes to print hearts onto fabric and stitch ribbons onto mob caps. 

She has, as followers of her distinctly ‘shabby-chic’ style will testify, a weakness for fripperies such as broderie anglaise and bobbles.

The two studio houses are joined by a ground level communal room, which is essentially a very grand hallway. Recently, a third home was purchased in the street which is home to the nanny and the couple’s two children, Billy Ray, six, and Nell, two.

So how on earth does it work? 

'He always visits, which is really touching. He's always coming over,' says Helena of Tim, in a way that suggests she considers this a perfectly normal version of cohabitation. 

It’s a rather rum state of affairs, but Helena enthuses: ‘It really is a great idea. You never have to compromise emotionally or feel invaded.’

It is only when you start to consider how very different they are that you begin to understand why the set-up works so well. After all, Tim - the creative genius behind macabre works such as Sweeney Todd and Sleepy Hollow - prefers to speak as little as possible, while Helena loves nothing more than to chatter away.

'He's much shyer than me,' she has said. 'I used to say that he was a home for abandoned sentences.'

(Source: euthanasia-for-mankind, via theproserpina)

indiemalik:

WHY DO PEOPLE SIMPLY REFUSE TO TAKE ONE DIRECTION SERIOUSLY BC OF THEIR MUSIC OR BC THEY’RE A BOYBAND WITH CUTE FACES LIKE THEY MAKE PEOPLE SO HAPPY AND THEY’RE ACTUALLY SO TALENTED THIS IS AN ISSUE THAT MUST BE RESOLVED 

(via niallersfridgeraiders)